Can Diabetic Dogs Have Coconut Oil; 6 Healthy Tips For Your Dog

Did you know that an approximated 60% of cats and 56% of canines in the US are overweight or overweight? It’s a disconcerting statistic, and as weight problems rates rise, our animals are becoming increasingly more prone to a wide range of illnesses and diseases.

Among the diseases related to the increase in weight problems in family pets is diabetes mellitus, a condition that happens when the body can not process glucose (a type of sugar) normally. According to Vetsource, an estimated 1 in 300 pet dogs and 1 in 230 cats will develop diabetes throughout their lifetime. And unfortunately, these statistics are just on the rise.

In today’s post, can diabetic dogs have coconut oil, we’ll take a look at the causes, indications, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetes in animals. We’ll share some quick pointers to help you prevent your animal from developing diabetes. Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil and will this help them?

Reasons for Diabetes

As pointed out previously, the source of diabetes is the body’s failure to procedure glucose effectively. Glucose is the main source of energy for cells in the body, and levels of glucose in the blood stream are regulated by a hormonal agent called insulin that’s made by beta cells in the pancreas.

Diabetes mellitus is categorized as Type I or Type II. Type I is known as insulin-dependent diabetes, it’s triggered by a total or near-total damage of the insulin-producing beta cells in an animal’s pancreas. In the absence of insulin, the body’s cells become starved as the nutrients are not able to enter them.

Type 2 diabetes is referred to as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. This type of diabetes occurs when the body can not respond typically to the amount of insulin manufactured by the pancreas. With Type II diabetes, there may be adequate insulin production, but the cells of the body can not utilize the nutrients they get effectively.

Threat elements for diabetes include genes, autoimmune illness, obesity, and other underlying medical conditions. Long-term use of medications such as steroids can likewise induce diabetes in pets.

Luckily, Type I diabetes— the most dangerous kind– is relatively unusual in animals. However Type II diabetes is becoming increasingly common in senior and middle-aged family pets due to elements such as high carb diet plans, lack of exercise, and over-vaccination.

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes

Left untreated, diabetes can cause complex illness– some of which can be possibly deadly. That’s why it’s so essential to recognize the early symptoms and signs of the illness.

Take your family pet to be analyzed by a veterinarian as soon as possible if you discover any of the following symptoms and signs. Early medical diagnosis and treatment considerably increase the chance of handling the illness efficiently.

  • Increased urination
  • Drinking water more often
  • Increased or reduced hunger
  • Weight loss 
  • Cataracts (especially in canines)
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Sleepiness

Medical diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes.

Diagnosis of diabetes in pets is straightforward. Initially, your vet will evaluate your family pet’s blood and urine for elevated levels of glucose. Additional blood tests are often run to eliminate other medical conditions, particularly in older animals.

Your veterinarian may likewise suggest tests such as a urine culture, thyroid screening, or X-rays to get a more total picture of your pet’s general health. If a diagnosis of diabetes is verified, effective treatment usually includes the following:

  • Regular blood and urine assessments.
  • A carefully controlled diet plan.
  • Insulin injections or oral glucose-regulating drugs.
  • Ongoing monitoring of your family pet’s health.

How Coconut Oil Can Assist Manage Diabetes.

Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil?

The MCFAs in coconut oil can supply much-needed energy to cells without negatively affecting blood sugar or insulin levels. Coconut oil likewise helps supply energy to cells since it’s easily absorbed without the requirement for pancreatic lipid enzymes or insulin.

In addition to can diabetic dogs have coconut oil, coconut oil puts less of a need on the digestion enzyme production of the pancreas, lowering stress on the organ and enabling it to operate better during mealtimes when insulin is produced most greatly.

To take pleasure in the health advantages of coconut oil, keep in mind to choose a high-quality, therapeutic-grade coconut oil. The suggested oil is sourced from a USDA-certified organic family farm in the Philippines and carefully made in their own facility.

Always feed your animal coconut oil in small amounts as part of a balanced, species-appropriate diet, and keep in mind that coconut oil need to never ever change any medication given to your family pet by your vet.

Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil

Diabetes Prevention

Now for fortunately. According to Dr. Karen Becker, DVM., NMD., the majority of cases of diabetes in pets are completely avoidable.

Research study has actually likewise shown that a diet rich in medium-chain fats such as coconut oil might assist prevent obesity and fight insulin resistance– both of which are risk factors for Type II diabetes.

To end up today’s post, here are some fast pointers about can diabetic dogs have coconut oil, to help you minimize the risk of your family pet developing diabetes:

  1. Feed a balanced, species-appropriate diet plan
  2. Exercise your pet daily
  3. Prevent over-vaccination by having your pet titer checked
  4. Schedule regular veterinarian checkups
  5. Supply a lot of fresh, clean drinking water
  6. Supplement your family pet’s diet plan with therapeutic-grade coconut oil

Type II diabetes is known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Diagnosis of diabetes in family pets is simple.


— Update: 05-01-2023 — cohaitungchi.com found an additional article Diabetes in Dogs – no matter the type from the website sitstay.com for the keyword can diabetic dogs have coconut oil.

Did you know that dogs can get diabetes? So sad to think they do. And even sadder if you are the owner of a dog who has been diagnosed with diabetes and you are not sure how to deal with it – must you give him the typical conventional medicines for diabetes, or are there holistic natural ways you can help your beloved pet? Thankfully, there are healthy solutions for your companion and friend.

More about diabetes in dogs

Well, diabetes falls into the group of hormonal diseases where the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin anymore – or maybe there is an over-production of the hormone, glucagon.

Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, has the function of making carbs available to the beta cells of the pancreas for energy. When the insulin becomes insufficient, it can even be totally absent; then the sugar will accumulate in the bloodstream. That leaves the cells starved of energy because they are unable to make use of the carbohydrates directly.

Dr. Peter Dobias, a holistic veterinarian, says that insulin is like a fuel tank release cap in your car, and if the cap is not open, the car can’t get refueled and will eventually stop. There might be plenty of gas at the pump, but if the cap is not opened when you start to pump, all the gas will spill out and cause a fire as well as pollution. It’s the same with diabetes. You can compare the fire with that of diabetic ketoacidosis. The dog’s sugar-starved cells give the body a signal to burn fat so it can supply energy, but when the fat starts burning fast, it creates ketones. These are toxic byproducts that can cause a state of severe intoxication and which can have potentially life-threatening results.

It is true to say that diabetes in dogs is rare; although over the years continues to rise – in both dogs and cats. The rise is thought to be correlated with more obesity, incorrect feeding, and a reduction in exercise. It is thought that dogs that eat non-processed diets, grain free foods, with cooked or raw meat and raw bones, veggies and some fruits are noted to be the ones where diabetes seems to be totally absent.

Read more  How Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar, Insulin & Insulin Resistance

Many of the processed food companies appear not to have done their homework; they are not being honest with owners of dogs – they say that kibble is better than wholesome food. Can you believe that what they are saying in essence, is that nature is wrong! Holistic vets, based on their experience, will say that when you provide your dog with a balanced, wholesome diet as well as essential natural supplements, you eliminate the chances of diabetes almost entirely.

Inflammation and strain on the pancreas is probably the main reason for diabetes. A dog’s pancreas is designed to digest mostly meat and other proteins along with a small percentage of plant material. But these days’ people have moved away from feeding their dogs these true natural dog foods. They have started feeding them on the foods of the day, i.e. grain-based and processed foods, which all put major stress on the pancreas. When dogs eat high-carbohydrates, processed foods, the pancreas becomes inflamed and stressed. What does inflammation do? It leads to the destruction of the pancreatic beta cells we were talking about earlier and antibodies form which act against the pancreatic tissue.

How do you know your dog has diabetes?

The signs and symptoms are not that specific. But look out for these:

  • He seems to be drinking more than usual
  • He urinates more than usual
  • He is losing weight
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Cataracts
  • An increase in appetite

How is diabetes diagnosed?

It is important that you choose the right veterinarian when it comes to diabetes in a dog. A vet who is open to a natural approach to treating dogs and to nutrition will help you make the right choices when it comes to discussing processed foods, etc. But no matter what, a vet will test your dog for the presence of ketones and glucose concentrations. This diagnosis becomes definite when glucose shows up in the urine and in the blood.

The right diet and supplements

When it comes to diabetes, most questions pet owners ask is around supplements and diet. The best way to feed a dog with diabetes is to offer a raw food diet which is so appropriate for dogs, one of meat, bones and predominantly leafy, green vegetables. Read here about commercial dog foods to avoid and which are suitable – always check with your vet, because there are some commercial dog foods that could get your dog sick or they are sick. Here are a couple of good principles to look at when feeding your dog from the raw food diet:

Avoid all rice and grain.

There is no kibble that is actually recommended even it is grain free – it’s not recommended for a dog with diabetes. Raw, dehydrated diets might be OK, but actually, it’s the raw or cooked diets that are the ideal ones to feed your dog – because there is not much of a difference in the results for raw and cooked diets. Feed your dog about 50-65% of raw or cooked meat, another 10-25% of raw bones and 25% of green, leafy vegetables – that’s if you want your furry friend to enjoy good health with many long and healthy years with you.

A diabetic dog should eat twice daily

Healthy, non-diabetic dogs should eat ideally once a day – then their digestive tract and glands are able to rest. But if your dog is diabetic, he should eat like twice daily and his insulin administered right after his meal. It is not suggested you feed your dog more than twice a day.

Avoid artificial supplements and vitamins

A lot of people don’t realize that heaps and heaps of supplements on the market are plain ordinary synthetic, made chemically. Believe it, there is a huge difference between naturally-sourced supplements and those that are made artificially. Thing is, artificial vitamins can resemble natural ones, and that plastic apple in the fruit bowl also looks like the real thing, doesn’t it? A dog’s body has limited abilities to regulate the fake synthetic stuff which can create severe imbalances in his body.

TOP groups of nutrients that your dog needs

  • Plant-based minerals and amino acids
  • Naturally cultured vitamins
  • Probiotics to look after digestion and immunity
  • Essential fatty acids oil, such as Omegas and Coconut oil (Remember to avoid fish oils that haven’t been tested for heavy metals and mercury)

The ultimate treatment of reversing your dog’s diabetes to the point where no insulin is needed is not discovered yet, but the reality might be not as far off as we think. A study published in the Diabetes journal in Spain used gene therapy to put dogs into remission with type one diabetes. But we will have to wait and see – in the meantime, if you follow the above tips and ideas, etc. there is a good chance that your dog will be healthier and his or her diabetes will be easier to control and the insulin requirement will be lower. Yay!! …. And we can hear all the doggies going woof!


— Update: 05-01-2023 — cohaitungchi.com found an additional article Coconut Oil For Dogs: New Research Says Stay Away from the website www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com for the keyword can diabetic dogs have coconut oil.

Coconut oil is celebrated by dog owners for its amazing health-boosting properties. Heck, we’ve even posted here on DNM about how great it is.

But I have to admit … I’ve never really given coconut oil to my own dogs. 

My gut told me it wasn’t quite right. 

Now I’m glad I listened to my gut. Because new research says your dog’s gut probably doesn’t like coconut oil either. 

What Are MCTs?

Let’s start with the benefits of coconut oil … or rather a fraction of the coconut oil called medium chain triglycerides (MCTs).

Fats are essentially chains of carbon atoms. And they’re classified into short, medium and long chain triglycerides (or fatty acids) by the number of carbon atoms they contain:

  • Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) contain fewer than 6 carbon atoms.
  • Medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) contain 6 to 12 carbon atoms.
  • Long chain triglycerides (LCTs) contain more than 12 carbon atoms.

Your dog doesn’t get SCFAs from his diet … they’re made by beneficial bacteria that live in his gut. MCTs and LCTs come from the foods he eats … but he mainly eats LCTs.

MCTs are found mainly in dairy products, palm and coconut oil. MCTs include these common fats:

  • Caproic acid (6 carbon atoms)
  • Caprylic acid (8 carbon atoms)
  • Capric acid (10 carbon atoms)  
  • Lauric Acid (12 carbon atoms)

Let’s look at MCTs in more detail since these are the reason most owners give their dogs coconut oil.

The Health Benefits Of MCTs

There are a lot of benefits to feeding your dog MCT. MCTs can:

  • Fuel the brain
  • Form ketones that improve cognitive function in older dogs
  • Reduce the number and severity of seizures
  • Help with weight loss
  • Lower blood sugar levels
  • Reduce chronic inflammation
  • Antimicrobial and antibacterial

Plus, one thing that makes MCTs uniquely beneficial is the way they’re digested …

Most fats your dog eats are LCTs (more than 12 carbon atoms). Because the chains of carbon atoms are longer, they take longer to break down in the digestive tract. And this requires more effort.

LCTs need the pancreas to release an enzyme called lipase for their digestion. Once they’re broken down, they need special proteins to escort them through the the cells lining the digestive tract (enterocytes). Once they’re through the intestinal wall cells, they move to the lymphatic system, where they’re transported to the thoracic duct by the heart … and they finally land in your dog’s blood. 

Once in the blood, most LCTs are stored as fat, although some may travel to the liver to be converted for energy. 

MCTs are digested differently than LCTs. 

Once MCTs are broken down by lipase, they can freely cross into the circulation through the enterocytes. They travel directly into the blood and go straight to the liver. The liver then quickly converts them to ketones

The liver can use ketones to fuel its own cells, help it detox or digest other foods. And the rest of the ketones go back into the blood where they’re used for fuel in the brain and the body. 

Read more  What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes In Women?

Unlike LCTS, MCTs are often used by the body as fuel and are much less likely to be stored as fat. This is why MCTs are a great addition for dogs … you get the benefits without the extra calories. Since more than half of dogs are considered obese today, that’s a significant benefit.

But what about coconut oil? How much of these beneficial MCTs does it contain?

How Much MCT Is In Coconut Oil?

The amount of MCT in coconut oil depends on what you consider an MCT …

On average, coconut oil is about 2/3 MCTs. But half of that amount is lauric acid. And researchers say that’s a potential problem …

With 12 carbon atoms, lauric acid is officially considered an MCT.

But lauric acid doesn’t behave like a MCT. And it has a sordid past … 

Why Lauric Acid Is Different Than MCTs

Lauric acid uses the same metabolic pathways as LCTs, not MCTs … and probably ends up dumped into fat stores like LCTs. 

So lauric acid, with its 12 carbon atoms, is fundamentally different than MCTs.

Veterinarian and PhD Melinda Culver explains:

“Somewhere around the ’70s, if you start to look through the literature, you’ll see that there’s kind of a change in how some of these academics and researchers are naming [MCTs]. They’ve kind of snuck the 12 in there and they called that a medium chain. Right about the time where coconut oil and palm oil were making a big push in the industry.

So even though coconut oil is advertised as high in MCTs… half of them are lauric acid. So it’s hard to call coconut oil a good source of MCTs if you’re after their health benefits. 

But why not just give your dog larger amounts of coconut oil to get the healthy pluses from MCTs?

There’s one very compelling reason …

Coconut Oil Contains Saturated Fats

While coconut oil does contain MCTs, it has a distinct disadvantage … it’s high in saturated fat. In fact, it’s over 80% saturated fat. In comparison, butter is 63% and pork lard is just 39% saturated fat.

And this is a problem for some scientists … 

In 2018, a Youtube video attacking coconut oil went viral. Coconut oil supporters rallied to defend it after Karin Michels, an epidemiologist at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, cautioned that the high amounts of saturated fats in coconut oil posed a risk to human health.

  She said coconut oil was “pure poison”  and “one of the worst things you can eat.” The backlash was instant and her speech was watched over a million times on Youtube.

Frank Sacks, the lead author of advisory at Harvard Chan School of Public Health, said he was shocked by the backlash from this recommendation. The fact that coconut oil isn’t good for you shouldn’t be news he said.

It’s been touted as healthy. But the science for this opinion is not there at all,” says Sacks. “In fact, the science says that coconut oil, which has mostly saturated fatty acids, raises your LDL cholesterol, which is linked with increased risk for heart disease.”

But what about dogs?

Do they suffer the same health risks as humans do when they eat saturated fats? In order to know the answer to that, you have to know what metabolic endotoxemia is …

Metabolic Endotoxemia

The only thing that lies between your dog’s intestinal contents and his blood is essentially a single layer of epithelial cells. Ordinarily, this works just fine … the cell membranes decide what gets transported into the blood (food and vitamins) and what should stay in the intestine (toxins and bacteria). 

But sometimes the spaces between these cells (or enterocytes) can widen … this is called leaky gut. When those gaps between the enterocytes widen, the cells no longer have any control over what travels out of the gut and into the bloodstream. So undigested food particles, viruses and bacteria can all enter the bloodstream and wreak havoc with your dog’s health.

Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil

Your dog’s immune system will try to attack all of these invaders, including the undigested food … and this is often the cause of food sensitivities in dogs. Chronic, low-grade inflammation follows and this drives most chronic diseases in dogs. 

Leaky gut is further complicated by endotoxins. The cell walls of some species of bacteria in your dog’s gut (gram-negative bacteria) contain lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is an endotoxin that can cause an immune reaction in your dog … and more low-grade inflammation. 

If your dog has leaky gut, LPS can leak between the inflamed enterocytes. It then enters the blood, travels to the organs, and spreads the endotoxins throughout the body.  

But LPS can enter your dog’s circulation even if he doesn’t have leaky gut …

LPS can be carried directly through the enterocytes and into the circulation, along with the fats from his diet, in little vesicles called chylomicrons. 

When there are enough endotoxins to cause chronic inflammation, the condition is called metabolic endotoxemia. And metabolic endotoxemia is linked to a plethora of health conditions, including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease and more.

Here’s where coconut oil fits in …

Coconut Oil, Dogs And Inflammation

Newer research shows that coconut oil is inflammatory and can cause leaky gut. In fact, the ASPCA advises owners not to give their dogs coconut oil because it can irritate the gut lining. contain oils that may cause stomach upset, loose stools or diarrhea.

Research also says coconut oil can also increase both the amount and the toxicity of LPS. This is why researchers say it’s a potentially dangerous addition to your dog’s diet (and to yours). 

Here are some of the research and the problems it says coconut oil can cause in your dog:

Coconut Oil Is High In Fat
Coconut oil is high in fat. Studies show that a high fat diet feeds species of bacteria that cause inflammation in the gut (leaky gut). And it causes the species of bacteria that contain toxic LPS to grow.

Coconut Oil Is Rich In Saturated Fats
Coconut oil is 80% saturated fat. Research shows saturated fatty acids cause inflammation in the gut, leading to leaky gut.

Lauric Acid
A 2018 study in Nutrients showed that lauric acid (which makes up about half of coconut oil) increases inflammation more than any other saturated fatty acid. Palmitic acid (also found in coconut oil) had the same effect.

Lauric acid is also antibacterial. While that’s viewed as a benefit, researchers say lauric acid can kill the gram-negative bacteria that have LPS in their membranes. The LPS can then travel through enterocytes with the dietary fats and circulate through the body.

Even without leaky gut.

LPS Uses Saturated Fats
LPS has tails called Lipid-A. These tails can either be made from saturated fats (like lauric or myristic acid) or from polyunsaturated fats.

When the Lipid-A tail of LPS is made of saturated fats, research shows the LPS is pro-inflammatory. This is the LPS that can trigger metabolic endotoxemia and low-grade inflammation in your dog. When the Lipid-A tail is made of polyunsaturated fats, research shows the inflammation stops. 

So if your dog eats a diet rich in saturated fats, and especially lauric acid, he’ll produce more toxic LPS … and there will be more inflammation. If he eats more fish or fish oil, he’ll produce LPS that reduces inflammation.

This 2013 study shows that the types of fat your dog eats can either increase or decrease the amount of endotoxins (LPS) in his blood. While fish oils reduced the amount of endotoxin, coconut oil increased the amount.

Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil
Endotoxin permeability after eating a meal with either coconut oil, fish oil or vegetable oil. Mani et al 2013.

Should Dogs Eat Coconut Oil?

More and more holistic vets are saying no to coconut oil for dogs.

Dr Jean Hofve says “There is no good physiologic reason to feed coconut oil to pets, and little research to support the claims made for it. Most of the purported benefits of coconut oil are not unique. Many other fats will do the same, but are safer and healthier.”

Dr Patricia Jordan cautions “Coconut oil contains fatty acids that contribute to the development of inflammation via LPS. In two studies, coconut oil seemed to create the most toxic form of LPS. The LPS triggers cytokines like interleukin-1 and 6 as well as interferons … and these cytokines are all involved in chronic inflammation.”

Read more  Diabetes in Dogs – no matter the type

And research microbiologist Kiran Kirshnan from Microbiome Labs will soon be publishing research that shows that the LCTs in coconut oil cause more LPS to be released … and cause more LPS to pass through the gut lining. 

And this research was done in dogs. 

“We are increasing the amount of endotoxins that are appearing in the circulatory system after a meal that has a fat like a coconut oil” says Kiran. “There’s some really good published studies that show of all the oils they tested, even vegetable oils … coconut oil was the most toxigenic. It increased this endotoxemia/leaky gut far more than any other of the oils tested.

Given all the negatives when it comes to coconut oil and gut health, why is coconut oil so popular for dogs (and their humans)?

The coconut industry – or some other industry – is promoting coconut oil” says Sacks. “People are gullible and will listen to advertising, especially when it comes to foods.

Maybe this is why I’ve never given in to the coconut oil hype.

Kicking The Coconut Oil Habit

If you still want to give your dogs the benefits of coconut oil, without the downside, you can give your dog MCT oil. It’s most often extracted from coconut oil.

MCT oil can also come from palm oil … you’ll want to avoid that since it’s not kind to the planet. And if you heed the advice of researchers, you’ll want to avoid MCT oil that contains lauric acid. 

If you give your dog MCT, start with a small amount .. about 1/8 tsp for small dogs. MCT can cause diarrhea if you give too much, so start slow and save your rugs. 

As for coconut oil, I won’t give it to my own dogs.

But what about the research that says coconut oil improves your dog’s health and skin conditions?

A 2016 review looked at coconut oil research to date and came to this conclusion:

Due to a lack of large, well‐controlled human studies published in peer‐reviewed journals demonstrating clear health benefits of coconut oil, frequent use of coconut oil should not be advised. So, if you spot coconut oil high up the ingredient list, think twice before eating the product on a regular basis.


— Update: 07-01-2023 — cohaitungchi.com found an additional article Can Coconut Oil Help Pets With Diabetes? from the website www.cocotherapy.com for the keyword can diabetic dogs have coconut oil.

Did you know that an estimated 60% of cats and 56% of dogs in the US are overweight or obese? It’s an alarming statistic, and as obesity rates rise, our pets are becoming more and more susceptible to a wide range of illnesses and diseases.

Can diabetic dogs have coconut oil

One of the diseases linked with the rise in obesity in pets is diabetes mellitus, a condition that occurs when the body cannot process glucose (a type of sugar) normally. According to Vetsource, an estimated 1 in 300 dogs and 1 in 230 cats will develop diabetes during their lifetime. And unfortunately, these statistics are only on the rise.

Clearly, diabetes is a modern-day epidemic that affects pets as well as people. In today’s post, we’ll take a look at the causes, signs, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetes in pets. We’ll also explore recent scientific research that links coconut oil with prevention of the disease and a reduction in its symptoms. Finally, we’ll share some quick tips to help you prevent your pet from developing diabetes.

Causes of Diabetes

As mentioned earlier, the root cause of diabetes is the body’s inability to process glucose properly. Glucose is the main source of energy for cells in the body, and levels of glucose in the bloodstream are regulated by a hormone called insulin that’s manufactured by beta cells in the pancreas.

Diabetes mellitus is classified as Type I or Type II. Type I is known as insulin-dependent diabetes, it’s caused by a total or near-total destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in an animal’s pancreas. Without insulin, the cells of the body become starved as nutrients are unable to enter them.

Type II diabetes is known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. This type of diabetes occurs when the body cannot respond normally to the amount of insulin manufactured by the pancreas. With Type II diabetes, there may be adequate insulin production, but the cells of the body cannot use the nutrients they receive properly.

Risk factors for diabetes include genetics, autoimmune disease, obesity, and other underlying medical conditions. Long-term use of medications such as steroids can also induce diabetes in pets.

Thankfully, Type I diabetes – the most dangerous kind – is relatively rare in pets. But Type II diabetes is becoming increasingly common in middle-aged and senior pets due to factors such as high carbohydrate diets, lack of exercise, and over-vaccination.

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes

Left untreated, diabetes can cause complicated health problems – some of which can be potentially life-threatening. That’s why it’s so important to recognize the early signs and symptoms of the disease.

If you notice any of the following signs and symptoms, take your pet to be examined by a veterinarian as soon as possible. Early diagnosis and treatment greatly increases the chance of managing the disease effectively.

  • Increased urination
  • Drinking water more frequently
  • Increased or decreased appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Cataracts (especially in dogs)
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Lethargy

Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes

Diagnosis of diabetes in pets is fairly straightforward. First, your veterinarian will test your pet’s blood and urine for elevated levels of glucose. Additional blood tests are sometimes run to rule out other medical conditions, especially in older pets.

Your veterinarian may also recommend tests such as a urine culture, thyroid testing, or X-rays to get a more complete picture of your pet’s overall health. If a diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed, successful treatment typically involves the following:

  • Regular blood and urine examinations
  • A carefully controlled diet
  • Insulin injections or oral glucose-regulating drugs
  • Ongoing monitoring of your pet’s health

How Coconut Oil Can Help Manage Diabetes

Here at CocoTherapy, we’re often asked if it’s safe for diabetic pets to eat coconut oil. To answer that question, here’s a short quote from Dr. Bruce Fife C.N., N.D., taken from his book Coconut Therapy for Pets:

“[The medium-chain fatty acids in coconut oil] can help moderate sugar release and thus help balance blood sugar levels, which can ease symptoms associated with diabetes.”

But that’s not all. The MCFAs in coconut oil can supply much-needed energy to cells without adversely affecting blood sugar or insulin levels. Coconut oil also helps supply energy to cells because it’s easily absorbed without the need for pancreatic lipid enzymes or insulin. It has also been shown to improve insulin secretion and utilization of blood glucose.

In addition, coconut oil puts less of a demand on the digestive enzyme production of the pancreas, reducing stress on the organ and allowing it to function more effectively during mealtimes when insulin is produced most heavily.

In order to enjoy the health benefits of coconut oil, remember to choose a high-quality, therapeutic-grade oil such as CocoTherapy coconut oil. Our oil is sourced from our USDA-certified organic family farm in the Philippines and carefully manufactured in our own facility.

Always feed your pet coconut oil in moderation as part of a balanced, species-appropriate diet, and keep in mind that coconut oil should never replace any medication given to your pet by your veterinarian.

Diabetes Prevention

Now for the really good news. According to Dr. Karen Becker, DVM., NMD., most cases of diabetes in pets are entirely preventable.

Research has also shown that a diet rich in medium-chain fatty acids such as coconut oil may help prevent obesity and fight insulin resistance – both of which are risk factors for Type II diabetes.

To finish up today’s post, here are some quick tips to help you reduce the risk of your pet developing diabetes: 

  • Feed a balanced, species-appropriate diet
  • Exercise your pet daily
  • Avoid over-vaccination by having your pet titer tested
  • Schedule regular health screenings with your veterinarian
  • Provide plenty of fresh, clean drinking water
  • Supplement your pet’s diet with CocoTherapy therapeutic-grade coconut oil

Thanks for reading! Please visit our website to find out more about the amazing health benefits of CocoTherapy therapeutic-grade coconut oil.

References

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About the Author: Tung Chi